Rabbits
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Bunny Sleeping03

While rabbits do not pose a threat to humans or pets, they can be quite destructive to many plants. They do not climb well so a yard or vegetable patch that is surrounded with small gauge fencing, at least 3 feet high, should keep them out. They can squeeze through small openings so existing fences can be wrapped with chicken wire as a low cost deterrent. For gardens that are unable to be fenced in, plants should be used that are not so appealing to their delicate taste buds. The following is a list of plants that the cotton tail and Brush Rabbit do not find so appealing. 

Rabbit resistant plants

Licorice Mint

Lavender

Daffodils

Foxglove

Red Hot poker

Oregano

Sage

Peony

Rosemary

Salvia

Santolina

Marigold

Thyme

Yucca

Cactus

Sage

Chrysothamnus

Falugia

Bunnies and Squirrel03

Helping Orphaned Babies

Many people think that rabbits dig deep holes in the ground where they live and give birth. While they may take over existing burrows, most nests are usually quite shallow sometimes created in barn stalls, or in long grasses above ground. To prevent accidental death, long grass areas should be checked for nests before they are mowed. Do not expect to see the mother laying with the babies as she will only visit them to feed late at night and during the early hours of the morning. If a nest is discovered before mowing, leave enough brush around the nest to keep it camouflaged from predators.  Babies will sometimes vacate a nest after accidental flooding from sprinklers. Place wet babies wrapped in a towel into a box. Put that box on top of a heating pad set on low. Babies can be put back into the nest the same day if everything is dry and none of the babies appear to be injured. Adult  and juvenile injured rabbits need to be placed into a closed box immediately with a towel .Put the box in a very quiet area away from people and pets.  Do not handle them as they can die from the stress and if they are placed in a heavy traffic area, they run the risk of breaking their backs , trying to escape. A sheet or towel draped over a pet carrier that is placed in a quiet location, may mean the difference between life or death for the rabbit. Babies will need an additional source of heat, (not just a towel). Take a long sock and fill it with 2 cups of dried rice. Put in the microwave for 1 minute. Place this under the towel and put the babies next to the mound. They should have a little room to move away if they get too hot. This heat may save their life, while waiting for a rehabber to call you back. Do not attempt to feed them as they may need to be hydrated first and you run the risk of aspiration as well as improper diet.

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Copyright © 2004 Nicky Thole/Karin Beer-Koller
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